How Does a Whole House Dehumidifier Work?
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How Does a Whole House Dehumidifier Work?

How Does a Whole House Dehumidifier Work?

If you live in Chicago’s North Shore and Chicago’s Northwest suburbs, you’re well aware that summers here often feature hot and humid air. After spending a day outside in high humidity, you want to be able to relax and cool down in a comfortable home environment.

But if you find yourself sticking to your couches and sweating indoors, the indoor humidity level is too high. Anything above 60 percent humidity can cause comfort issues and can even damage your home.

If your air conditioner is struggling to balance the humidity levels in your home, contact the indoor air quality professionals at Ravinia Plumbing, Sewer, Heating & Electric. In our most recent blog, Ravinia Plumbing discusses how whole house dehumidifiers work and the benefits of having one installed.

For indoor air quality services, reach out to Ravinia Plumbing today.

How Does a Whole House Dehumidifier Work?

Aside from providing cool air, air conditioners are also tasked with balancing relative humidity levels during the warmer months. But if your air conditioning system is older and inefficient – or the outdoor humidity level suddenly skyrockets – it might struggle to keep up.

That’s where installing a whole house dehumidifier can come in handy. Unlike portable dehumidifiers that only remove moisture from small spaces such as a bedroom, whole house dehumidifiers provide moisture control for your entire home’s air supply.

Whole house dehumidifiers are installed directly to the return duct leading to your AC system components. As air passes through the dehumidifier, it is cooled by the unit’s evaporator coil. When this occurs, water vapor condenses into a liquid form and falls out of suspension and into a reservoir tank. This water is then funneled away from the home through a dedicated drain line. The existing air is then cooled by the air conditioner and circulated back into your living areas.

What Are the Benefits of Installing a Dehumidifier?

Some of the benefits of installing a whole house dehumidifier include:

Healthier Air

Humid indoor air can cause allergens and other pollutants to thrive, which can lead to health issues, especially for people who suffer from allergies, asthma or other respiratory illnesses.

Eliminating Mold and Mildew Growth

When indoor humidity levels climb past 60 percent, there is a heightened risk of mold growth. Exposure to mold spores can cause allergic symptoms such as coughing, runny nose, headache and fatigue. Mold can also damage your home and its belongings.

Protecting Your Home

High indoor humidity levels can also damage homes by causing wood floors to warp, paint to peel, and stains to develop on walls and ceilings. This can lead to significant and costly repairs.

Improved Cooling Efficiency

With the installation of a whole house dehumidifier, your air conditioner won’t have to work as hard to condition the air since excess moisture has already been removed. You also may not need to turn the air conditioner as low because your body will stay more comfortable with the absence of excess moisture. This can reduce wear and tear on your air conditioner and lower your energy bills.

Contact Ravinia Plumbing for Whole House Dehumidifier Installation Services

When it’s hot and sticky outside, stay cool and comfortable inside with the installation of a whole house dehumidifier. To schedule this and other HVAC system services, contact Ravinia Plumbing today.

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